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Centers and Research Activities

At West Point, research is organized and administered through centers.  These centers, affiliated with and coordinated by the Institute for Innovation and Development (IID), provide the infrastructure and support necessary to tackle the nation’s and the world’s most challenging problems. Our research centers bring context to the classroom, are central to our vibrant and pioneering faculty, and are one way West Point connects to the Army and to the Nation.

Our students are driven, our faculty is world-class, and through our centers, scholars and scientists thrive and produce their best work.  Cadets regularly win Best Paper Awards at national and international graduate-level conferences, our faculty hold fellowships and chairmanships in their discipline's national organizations and our products are deployed to the soldier.

In addition to applied research, there are centers at West Point that focus on other aspects of supporting the USMA mission.  What follows is a list of research, academic, and support centers and programs both at West Point and partnered with West Point; many are linked to program websites.

What's Up in West Point Research?

The Dean's Weekly Activity Reports  

  
  
  
  
Dean's Weekly Significant Activities Report 21 September 2016.pdf
  
9/23/2016 9:58 AMPatrick Gill
Dean's Weekly Significant Activities Report 14 September 2016.pdf
  
9/23/2016 9:58 AMPatrick Gill
Dean's Weekly Significant Activities Report 7 September 2016.pdf
  
9/23/2016 9:58 AMPatrick Gill
Dean's Weekly Significant Activities Report 31 August 2016.pdf
  
9/23/2016 9:58 AMPatrick Gill
Dean's Weekly Significant Activities Report 24 August 2016.pdf
  
9/23/2016 9:59 AMPatrick Gill


Click here for past issues of the Dean's Weekly Activity Reports 

 

 
 
A Soldier from Fort Benning's Maneuver Battle Lab fires an M249 Squad Automatic Weapon equipped with a recoil reduction system designed and built by a group of Mechanical Engineering Firsties. The system, designed at the behest of the Army's Armament Research, Development, and Engineering Center (ARDEC), reduces both the recoil force felt by the firer and muzzle climb, leading to more accurate, effective fires.