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Department of Chemistry and Life Science : Display Biographical Details



Photo of http://www.usma.edu/chemistry/SiteAssets/SitePages/Current%20Faculty/Wickiser.png


Dr. J. Kenneth Wickiser


Associate Professor
DoD Civilian

Contact Information:
Office Location: Bartlett Hall, Room 440-C
Phone: 845-938-5813
Email: Ken.Wickiser@usma.edu

​Dr. Wickiser is the Director of the Center for Molecular Science, the Deputy Director of Life Science, the Course Director for Genetics and Methods and Applications in Biotechnology, and a Research Associate in the Network Science Center. He also teaches Genetics, Cell Biology, General Chemistry I and II, and the Special Topics course in RNA Forms of Genetic Control. His research interests include studying RNA-based forms of genetic control, biological networks, adaptive coloration of marine animals using hyperspectral imagery, and assessing the biological response to military explosives contamination using model organisms such as bacteria and fungus. The research involves behavioral and molecular analysis (RNA, protein, and metabolites) to shed light on complex networks of biological systems. His work involves collaborations with Yale University, the Marine Biological Laboratory, University of Maryland-College Park, Carnegie Mellon University, and the Army Research Laboratory and is generously supported by the Network Science Center, the Army Research Office, the Army Research Laboratory, and DARPA.Dr. Wickiser is the Director of the Life Science Program and is an associate in the Center for Molecular Science. He also teaches General Biology, Biotechnology, Biochemistry, Genetics, Cell Biology, General Chemistry I and II, and the Special Topics courses in RNA Forms of Genetic Control and Bioengineering. His research interests include studying human biomarker profiles in patients with sports-related ACL injury, Depression, and Concussion as well as his long-standing work in RNA-based forms of genetic control and biological networks. The research involves behavioral and molecular analysis (RNA, protein, and metabolites) to shed light on complex networks of biological systems. His work involves collaborations with Yale University, the Uniformed Services University, and the Army Research Laboratory and is generously supported by the Congressionally Directed Medical Research Program, the Defense Threat Reduction Agency, the Army Research Office, the Army Research Laboratory, and DARPA.